Interesting, if demoralising, article about how people get greedier about ordering when they don’t have to wait, or give their order to another human.

Here’s the most depressing bit:

The Chili’s version of the Ziosk menus is programmed to have images of dessert (a molten chocolate cake, say) pop up while customers are still eating their main courses. 

Sounds hellish.

We thought, “What a crazy thing to make. There’s this manufactured, centrally planned toy that creates all of this spontaneous, democratic, populous creativity.” The tension between somebody dictating how you’re supposed to build the thing and these fans making their own thing seemed like a great idea for a movie about creativity. Lego just trusted us and said, “Well, please make sure there are cool vehicles in the movie so we can make toys.”

Phil Lord, on writing The Lego Movie (from Hollywood Reporter)

I’d like to think that the last line isn’t an exact quote, and that the Lego Group were as excited about making a fun, emotional movie as they were about simply wanting to sell more product.

It’s also lovely that the movie explores that tension between following set instructions and free building, as it’s invariably the thing that many adults say about Lego ("in my day it was all just basic Lego and your own imagination, none of this fiddly tiny bricks and following instructions nonsense"). In truth though, there has always been both modes of play, and many kids find it more enjoyable to build the sets (at least initially).

I’m kinda glad that a sequel is planned, but it’ll be hard to follow on from the first film.

TfL have announced that, during the football World Cup, results and score updates from the matches will be displayed to passengers on the tube via the dot-matrix platform displays.
On the one hand, this is a good public service, as I’m sure there will be lots of people following the World Cup who find themselves travelling whilst some of the matches are on.
On the other hand, this is also advertising (the service is sponsored by ESPN FC), on a display surface which was designed solely for crucial transport information (the destinations and times of the next trains):

This is a great way to keep our passengers up to date on the football and we are really pleased to be teaming up with ESPNFC to deliver this. It also generates a bit of money to allow us to keep investing in further improvements to the tube network.

The exact terms of the deal haven’t been released (how much money are we talking here?) and it’s also unclear how the information will actually be displayed on the screens, and how it competes for space alongside the regular service information. Will the goal alerts be on the second line only? Will it say ‘from ESPN.com’ each time? We’ll have to wait and see.
The partnership deal also includes the following:

ESPNFC will run an advertising campaign on the home page and journey planner section of the TfL.gov.uk website, as well as experiential activity involving football freestylers at Stratford, Charing Cross and Tottenham Court Road stations.

(not sure what the last bit means)
Feels like a very fine line to be treading to me. I’m don’t mind TfL selling ad space on the tube (a tradition which goes back to the very start), but we should be mindful of the work that Frank Pick did to confine ads to defined spaces, rather than plastering them everywhere, as happened before he rationalised things. I also think that TfL should be making decisions on what non-transport related news to convey (on incidental media) based upon what’s best for passengers, not what’s best for sponsors.

TfL have announced that, during the football World Cup, results and score updates from the matches will be displayed to passengers on the tube via the dot-matrix platform displays.

On the one hand, this is a good public service, as I’m sure there will be lots of people following the World Cup who find themselves travelling whilst some of the matches are on.

On the other hand, this is also advertising (the service is sponsored by ESPN FC), on a display surface which was designed solely for crucial transport information (the destinations and times of the next trains):

This is a great way to keep our passengers up to date on the football and we are really pleased to be teaming up with ESPNFC to deliver this. It also generates a bit of money to allow us to keep investing in further improvements to the tube network.

The exact terms of the deal haven’t been released (how much money are we talking here?) and it’s also unclear how the information will actually be displayed on the screens, and how it competes for space alongside the regular service information. Will the goal alerts be on the second line only? Will it say ‘from ESPN.com’ each time? We’ll have to wait and see.

The partnership deal also includes the following:

ESPNFC will run an advertising campaign on the home page and journey planner section of the TfL.gov.uk website, as well as experiential activity involving football freestylers at Stratford, Charing Cross and Tottenham Court Road stations.

(not sure what the last bit means)

Feels like a very fine line to be treading to me. I’m don’t mind TfL selling ad space on the tube (a tradition which goes back to the very start), but we should be mindful of the work that Frank Pick did to confine ads to defined spaces, rather than plastering them everywhere, as happened before he rationalised things. I also think that TfL should be making decisions on what non-transport related news to convey (on incidental media) based upon what’s best for passengers, not what’s best for sponsors.

We have deliberately avoided publishing an image of the reverse. We found that people were using the address to make donations to the Museum. While altruistic, the tokens are in fact registered objects in the collection, and we are unable to access the Bitcoins that people donate because it would mean destroying the holographic strip, resulting in damage to the object.

Bitcoin: how do we display the intangible? (Comment by curator Tom Hockenhull)

Follow-up comment by Mike Komaransky:

Perhaps those aren’t donations but transactions of a different character? I know of few other museum pieces where the viewer can directly increase (and not decrease) the value of the piece and do so anonymously.